Symphonic Sisters

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This blog really ought to be run by the extraordinary Frank J. Oteri, who is a considerably more omnivorous listener than myself – many of his explorations wind up on my list.

In addition to being a remarkable composer, Frank is the Composer Advocate at New Music USA and the Co-Editor of NewMusicBox, a web magazine he founded, which has been online since May 1999. He is also the Vice President of the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM) and serves on the board of directors of the International Association of Music Information Centres (IAMIC).

All these roles feed Frank’s insatiable interest in new music of all forms. One fascinating exploration he recently made was a single numbered symphony, in ascending order, each by a different female composer. (He actually went considerably more in depth and farther afield than that, but let’s start here).

This has been my listening for the last several days, and it’s a fascinating range of either works or composers I didn’t know.

N.B. While I’ve posted youtube links where possible, I urge you to purchase these works. Streaming pays next to nothing to the living composers. Album purchases actually compensate the artists.

Symphony No. 1 in f minor, op. 41 (1916-17, rev 1920) [ca. 48’]
by Dora Pejačević (1885-1923, Croatia)
Recorded by Deutsche Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz conducted by Ari Rasilainen
(cpo 777-418-2)

Published by Muzički informativni centar, Zagreb

Symphony No. 2 (1993) [ca. 18’]
by Chen Yi (b. 1953, China; based in U.S.A. since 1986)
Recorded by The Women’s Philharmonic conducted by JoAnn Falletta (New Albion NA 090)
Published by the Theodore Presser Company

Symphony No. 3 in c minor (1938-40) [ca. 29’]
by Florence Price (1887-1953, U.S.A.)
Recorded by The Women’s Philharmonic conducted by Apo Hsu (Koch International Classics 3-7518-2)
Published by G. Schirmer

Symphony No. 4 ‘A Passing Shadow’ (2000) [23’]
by Tsippi Fleischer (b. 1946, Israel)
Score published by the Israel Music Institute (IMI 7265)
Players of the Prague Philharmonic conducted by Jiri Mikula (Vienna Modern Masters VMM 3053)

Symphony No. 5 ‘Amen’ (1989-90) [ca. 14’]
by Galina Ustvolskaya (1919-2006, Russia)
Recorded by The St. Petersburg Soloists conducted by Oleg Malov (Megadisc MDC 7854)
Published by Musikverlag Hans Sikorski

Symphony No. 6 ‘Patria eterna’ (1988-89) [26’]
by Liana Alexandra (1947-2011, Romania)
Recorded by the Romanian Radio Orchestra conducted by Paul Popescu
Score from the Liana Alexandra Estate available at the International Music Score Library Project via a Creative Commons Licence

Symphony No. 7 in f minor (1855-56 premiered 1862) [ca. 34’]
by Emilie Mayer (1812-1883, Germany)
(sometimes misidentified as Mayer’s Symphony No 5, a work which is actually lost)
Performed by the Kammersymphonie Berlin conducted by Jürgen Bruns (Dreyer Gaido)
Published by Furore Verlag

Symphony No. 8 ‘Indian Sounds’ (1991)
by Gloria Coates (b. 1938 U.S.A.; based in Germany since 1969)
Performed by Kathleen Eberlein and Rose Bihler Shah (voices and stones) with the Musica-viva-ensemble Dresden conducted by Jürgen Wirrmann (New World Records 80599)

Symphony No. 9 ‘Celestial Symphony’ (2014-15) [ca. 15’]
by Barbara Harbach (b. 1946, U.S.A.)
London Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by David Angus (MSR Classics MS 1614)
http://www.msrcd.com/catalog/cd/MS1614

The cello concerto I wish I’d written

The cello concerto I wish I’d written

If I ever get commissioned to write a cello concerto – and I’m very much hoping I will some day – it is going to be hard to not have it be heavily influenced by British composer Mark Bowden’s captivating Lyra, performed by Oliver Coates and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales on a compendium album of the composer’s work. This alternately lyrical, kinetic, vibrant dance between soloist and orchestra is one of the most inspiring pieces of new concert music I’ve heard in a while. The instrumental writing is kaleidoscopic and fresh, and the piece leads the ear along in a way I really admire. Highly recommended.

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A new music panoply

A new music panoply

Since 2005, Marvin Rosen has held a yearly 24-25 hour marathon during the December holidays of new “concert” music as part of his “Classical Discoveries” show on Princeton, NJ radio station WPRB, devoted to music written within the previous ten years or so. This heroic and invaluable endeavor offers music by a panoply of composers from around the world, from the well known to the not so much. In the latter category, I’ve had the great honor of being included in the roster twice, last year with my Opus 20 songs for low male voice and piano.

Catching up on this fantastic panorama of contemporary concert music, generally during the holiday break from my Day Job or afterwards, is one of my favorite ways to immerse myself in concert music and exposes me to hosts of composers I might otherwise never get to know. Like Will Robin’s newer but equally invaluable Symphomania, I can’t recommend this series enough. Happily you can access it at your own rate and leisure at http://www.classicaldiscoveries.org/aboutmr.html.

 

The original 5 to 9 composer

As I further my advocacy for the #5to9 artist, or composer with a day job, it’s seemed overdue to delve back in to the work of the pioneer in this area, as in so many: Charles Ives. These gorgeous, probing accounts from the Seattle Symphony under Ludovic Morlot of Ives’ 3rd and 4th symphonies, as well as the haunting “Central Park In The Dark”, have been inspiring reminders that, while you may have to make your living outside of music, that needn’t compromise the quality or adventurousness of your creative output. Sometimes being outside of the crucible can free you up, as proved by these beautifully performed remarkable works.