The cello concerto I wish I’d written

The cello concerto I wish I’d written

If I ever get commissioned to write a cello concerto – and I’m very much hoping I will some day – it is going to be hard to not have it be heavily influenced by British composer Mark Bowden’s captivating Lyra, performed by Oliver Coates and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales on a compendium album of the composer’s work. This alternately lyrical, kinetic, vibrant dance between soloist and orchestra is one of the most inspiring pieces of new concert music I’ve heard in a while. The instrumental writing is kaleidoscopic and fresh, and the piece leads the ear along in a way I really admire. Highly recommended.

71OC3rTxAML._SS500

A new music panoply

A new music panoply

Since 2005, Marvin Rosen has held a yearly 24-25 hour marathon during the December holidays of new “concert” music as part of his “Classical Discoveries” show on Princeton, NJ radio station WPRB, devoted to music written within the previous ten years or so. This heroic and invaluable endeavor offers music by a panoply of composers from around the world, from the well known to the not so much. In the latter category, I’ve had the great honor of being included in the roster twice, last year with my Opus 20 songs for low male voice and piano.

Catching up on this fantastic panorama of contemporary concert music, generally during the holiday break from my Day Job or afterwards, is one of my favorite ways to immerse myself in concert music and exposes me to hosts of composers I might otherwise never get to know. Like Will Robin’s newer but equally invaluable Symphomania, I can’t recommend this series enough. Happily you can access it at your own rate and leisure at http://www.classicaldiscoveries.org/aboutmr.html.

 

The original 5 to 9 composer

As I further my advocacy for the #5to9 artist, or composer with a day job, it’s seemed overdue to delve back in to the work of the pioneer in this area, as in so many: Charles Ives. These gorgeous, probing accounts from the Seattle Symphony under Ludovic Morlot of Ives’ 3rd and 4th symphonies, as well as the haunting “Central Park In The Dark”, have been inspiring reminders that, while you may have to make your living outside of music, that needn’t compromise the quality or adventurousness of your creative output. Sometimes being outside of the crucible can free you up, as proved by these beautifully performed remarkable works.